Athens, Greece

Workshop for Physicochemical Analysis of Metal Objects and Ceramics

Period:
Code: PCAMC 24
Session 1: 24 - 28 June, 2024
Session 2: 01 - 05 July, 2024
Session 3: 24 June - 05 July, 2024
Academic credits available: 3, 6
Cost starting from: from 999 EUR/approx. 1299 USD

   

                General Information    

   

Project type: Workshop on Physicochemical Analysis of Metal Objects and Ceramics

Workshop started: 2023

About the project and the workshop: Participants will be guided through the History and Construction technology of ethnographic and archaeological ceramics or metal objects and consequent stages of their study and documentation. The necessity of physicochemical analysis in archaeology and in conservation and the application of Optical Microscopy (OM), X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pXRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS), IR spectroscopy and Statistical analysis will be carried out as well. Finally, the integrated analytical approach in the study of ceramics: combining dating techniques, petrography, elemental analysis, SEM, XRD, IR spectroscopy and 3D Scanning will be presented.

Artifacts & monuments in the project's focus: authentic ceramics and metal objects

Project venue: Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (INN) at the National Centre for Scientific Research ˊDemokritosˋ

BHF partners in this project:

Academic coordinator: Dr Adamandia Panagopoulou (Conservator of Antiquities; Post-Doc Researcher in archaeological materials at Barcelona University in Spain with 'NCSR' Demokritos in Greece; Leiden University in the Netherlands)

Field school coordinators: Dr. Angela Pencheva (Balkan Heritage Foundation & Field School Program Manager) and Dr Adamandia Panagopoulou (NCSR "Demokritos")

Lecturers:

  • Dr. Adamantia Panagopoulou - Conservator of Antiquities; Post-Doc Researcher in archaeological materials at Barcelona University in Spain with 'NCSR' Demokritos in Greece; Leiden University in the Netherlands.

Field school sessions available:

  • One-week field school: “Workshop for Physicochemical Analysis of Metal Objects”:  June 25 - 29, 2024      
  • One-week field school: “Workshop for Physicochemical Analysis of Ceramics”: July 1 - 5, 2024 

Application deadlines: until the places are filled or May 29th, 2024

Minimum length of stay: one week

Minimum age: 18

Number of field school places available: maximum 12

Language: English

Experience required: None

Special considerations:    

Note: Citizens of the EU, EEA, USA, Canada, Japan, Australia and New Zealand do not need an entry visa for Greece. Citizens of countries not mentioned above should check in advance whether they will need entry visas for the country. The cost of any visas is not included in the price of the field school!

Special Requirements:

  • Good manual dexterity skills and ability to work carry out delicate bench work.
  • The reimbursement payment does not cover insurance. It is necessary to arrange your own insurance before your trip to Greece. All EU citizens can use Greek medical services as long as they can provide evidence of their home-country health insurance with a card, certificate, etc.
  • The participants should have medical insurance including repatriation. The participants should inform the project staff about any health issues, allergies, and food preferences.
  • Participants should bring clothes and toiletries suitable for warm and sunny weather (26 -36 C), but should also prepare for rainy, windy and chilly days.
  • Participants should bring a white standard lab coat needed for the conservation treatments in the labs.
  • Participants are also expected to prepare for the field school by reading the materials that will be sent by e-mail before the beginning of the project.
  • Participants will use the tools and equipment available at the labs and are not required to bring any additional equipment apart perhaps for favorite personal tools.   

The Workshop    

   

In 2024, the workshops about ‘Physicochemical Analysis of Ceramics’ and ‘Physicochemical Analysis of Metal Objects’ will be hosted by the Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (INN) at the National Centre for Scientific Research ˊDemokritosˋ in Greece. They provide a unique opportunity for students and experts to gain comprehensive knowledge and hands-on experience on physicochemical analysis of pottery and metal objects.  During the project weeks, participants will work with authentic ceramics and metal objects. The project includes three modules: theoretical and practical part in the physicochemical analysis of ceramics or metal objects; training, study visits to the Acropolis Museum, Byzantine and Christian Museum and excursion at the Salamina Island.   

By the end of the workshop the participants will:    

  • get acquainted with the basic methods of documentation and physicochemical analyses of objects;   
  • learn about the necessity of physicochemical analyses on archaeological objects;   
  • learn about shapes, types and technology of of metal objects and pottery and improve their knowledge on history and archaeology in Greece;

All participants will receive:

  • Reading materials (in PDF version by e-mail);
  • Balkan Heritage Field School Certificate specifying the fieldwork hours, educational modules, and sites visited;
  • BHFS T-shirt.        

 The Team   

   

Academic coordinator:

  • Dr. Adamantia Panagopoulou - Conservator of Antiquities; Post-Doc Researcher in archaeological materials at Barcelona University in Spain with 'NCSR' Demokritos in Greece; Leiden University in the Netherlands

Field school coordinators:

  • Dr. Angela Pencheva (Balkan Heritage Foundation & Field School Program Manager)

Lecturers:

  • Dr Adamantia Panagopoulou - Conservator of Antiquities; Post-Doc Researcher in archaeological materials at Barcelona University in Spain with 'NCSR' Demokritos in Greece; Leiden University in the Netherlands.   
  • Dr. Anno Hein, Researcher, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Centre for Scientific Research ʽDemokritosʼ, Greece   
  • Dr. Giorgos Polymeris, Researcher, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Centre for Scientific Research ʽDemokritosʼ, Greece   
  • Dr. Eleni Filippaki, Researcher,Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Centre for Scientific Research ʽDemokritosʼ, Greece   
  • Dr. Evangelos Tsakalos, Post-Doc Researcher, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Centre for Scientific Research ʽDemokritosʼ, Greece

The Program   

The course consists of two educative modules on the subject in their focus: METAL & CERAMICS. Each module consists of approx. 33 hours of lectures, workshops and study visits to significant sites in Athens.   

   

PHYSICOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF METAL OBJECTS     

  •  History of ethnographic and archaeological metal artefacts.
  • Construction technology of ethnographic and archaeological metal artefacts.
  • The necessity of physicochemical analysis on metals.
  • Optical Microscopy on metal objects.
  • Elemental Analysis of metal objects.   
  • Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on metal objects.
  • Multianalytical approach on metal objects (XRF, ICP, Metallography, IR, UV, SEM).
  • 3D scanning techniques in Archaeology.     

   

PHYSICOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF CERAMICS   

   

  • History of ethnographic and archaeological ceramics. Construction technology of ethnographic and archaeological ceramics.
  • The necessity of physicochemical analysis in archaeology and conservation.
  • The application of dating techniques in archaeology.
  •  The luminescence dating in archaeology.
  • Optical Microscopy on ceramics.
  • Elemental Analysis of Ceramics: Scope and Analytical Methods.
  • Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on ceramics.   
  • 3D scanning techniques in Archaeology.   
  • The integrated analytical approach in the study of ceramics: combining petrography, elemental analysis, SEM, XRD, IR spectroscopy.

The Agenda

 

June 25-29

Lecture 1: History of ethnographic and archaeological metal artefacts.

Lecture 2: Construction technology of ethnographic and archaeological metal artefacts.   

Lecture 3: The necessity of physicochemical analysis on metals.     

Lecture 4: Optical Microscopy on metal objects.   

Lecture 5: Elemental Analysis of metal objects.

Lecture 6: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on metal objects.   

Lecture 7: Multianalytical approach on metal objects (XRF, ICP, Metallography, IR, UV, SEM).

Lecture 8: 3D scanning techniques in Archaeology.

Workshop 1: Documentation techniques of metal objects.   

Workshop 2: Optical Microscopy on metal objects (Application).

Workshop 3: Optical Microscopy on metal objects (Report).   

Workshop 4: X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pXRF) on metal objects (Application).   

Workshop 5: X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pXRF) on metal objects (Report with statistical results).   

Workshop 6: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on metal objects (Application).   

Workshop 7: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on metal objects (Report with statistical results).   

June 1-5, 2024

Lecture 1: History of ethnographic and archaeological ceramics. Construction technology of ethnographic and archaeological ceramics.   

Lecture 2: The necessity of physicochemical analysis in archaeology and conservation.   

Lecture 3: The application of dating techniques in archaeology.   

Lecture 4: The luminescence dating in archaeology.      

Lecture 5: Optical Microscopy on ceramics.   

Lecture 6: Elemental Analysis of Ceramics: Scope and Analytical Methods.   

Lecture 7: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on ceramics.

Lecture 8: 3D scanning techniques in Archaeology.   

Lecture 9: The integrated analytical approach in the study of ceramics: combining petrography, elemental analysis, SEM, XRD, IR spectroscopy.

Workshop 1: Documentation techniques of ceramics.   

Workshop 2: Optical Microscopy on ceramics (Application).

Workshop 3: Optical Microscopy on ceramics (Report).      

Workshop 4: X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pXRF) on ceramics (Application).   

Workshop 5: X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (pXRF) on ceramics (Report with statistical results).

Workshop 6: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDS) on ceramics (Application)   

Guided Visits: Acropolis Museum and Byzantine and Christian Museum;   

For the participants in both workshop weeks: Excursion to Salamina Island on June 30, 2024. 


   

     Reading Background

   

  • Buxeda i Garrigos, J., Cau Ontiveros, M.A., Kilikoglou, V., 2003b. Chemical variability in clays and pottery from a traditional cooking pot production village: testing assumptions in Pereruela. Archaeometry, 45, pp. 1–17.
  • Derrick, M. R., Stulik, D. and Landry, J. M., 1999. Infrared Spectroscopy in Conservation Science, Scientific Tools for Conservation. Los Angeles: The Getty Conservation Institute.
  • Egerton, R. F., 2005. Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: An Introduction to TEM, SEM, and AEM. New York: Publications Springer.
  • Ferretti, M., 2000. X-ray fluorescence applications for the study and conservation of cultural heritage. In: D. C. Creagh and D. A. Bradley, eds. Radiation in Art and Archaeometry. Amsterdam: Elsevier, pp. 285-296.
  • Freestone, I. C. and Middlestone, A. P., 1987. ‘Mineralogical applications of the analytical SEM in archaeology’. Mineralogical Magazine, 51, pp. 21-31.
  • Guggenheim, S. and Martin, R. T., 1995. ‘Definition of Clay and Clay Mineral: Joint Report of the Aipea and CMS Nomenclature Committees’. Clays and Clay Minerals, 44(5), pp. 710-712.
  • Hein, A., 2018. Elemental Analysis of Pottery. In: S. L. L. Varela., ed. The Encyclopedia of Archaeological Sciences. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., pp. 1-5.
  • Hein, A., 2021. Revisiting the groups – Exploring the feasibility of portable EDXRF in provenance studies of transport amphorae in the Eastern Aegean. In: M. Hegewisch, M. Dazkiewicz and G. Schneider, eds. Using pXRF for the Analysis of Ancient Pottery. Berlin: Topoi-Berlin Studies of the Ancient World, pp. 43-61.
  • Hein, A. and Kilikoglou, V., 2017. ‘Compositional variability of archaeological ceramics in the eastern Mediterranean and implications for the design of provenance studies’. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 16, pp. 564-572.
  • Hein, A. and Kilikoglou, V., 2020. ‘Ceramic raw materials: how to recognize them and locate the supply basins: chemistry’. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 12, p. 180.
  • Hein, A., Dobosz, A., Day, P. M. and Kilikoglou, V., 2021. ‘Portable ED-XRF as a tool for optimizing sampling strategy: The case study of a Hellenistic amphora assemblage from Paphos (Cyprus)’. Journal of Archaeological Science, p. 133.
  • Henderson, J., 2020. The Science and Archaeology of Materials. An Investigation of Inorganic Materials. Routledge.
  • Janssens, K., 2004. X-ray based methods of analysis. In: K. Jannsens and R. Van Grieken, eds. Non-Destructive Microanalysis of Cultural Heritage Materials. Amsterdam: Elsevier, pp. 129-226.
  • Janssens, K., Vittiglio, G., Deraedt, I., Aerts, A., Vekemans, B., Vincze, L., Wei, F., Deryck, I., Schalm, O., Adams, F., Rindby, A., Knochel, A., Simionovici, A. and Snigirev, A., 2000. ‘Use of microscopic XRF for non-destructive analysis in art and archaeometry’. X-ray Spectrometry, 29, pp. 73-91.
  • Jose-Yacaman, M. and Ascencio, J. A., 2000. Electron microscopy and its application to the study of archaeological materials and art preservation. In: E. Ciliberto and G. Spoto, eds. Modern Analytical Methods in Art and Archaeology. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc., pp. 405-444.
  • Karydas, A. G., 2007. ‘Application of a portable XRF Spectrometer for the non- Invasive ana Kilikoglou, V., Maniatis, Y., Grimanis, A. P., 1988. The effect of purification and firing of clays on trace element provenance studies. Archaeometry, 30, 1, pp. 37-46. lysis of museum metal artifacts’. Annali di Chimica, p. 97.
  • Kousouni C.K., Ganetsos Th., Panagopoulou A., 2021, Non – Destructive XRF Analysis of Metallic Objects from Benaki Museum of Islamic Art, Scientific Culture, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 69-79, Open access, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4465536.
  • Kousouni C.K., Panagopoulou A., 2018, Non-destructive physicochemical analysis and conservation of metallic book covers of ecclesiastical books from Saint Mavra and Timotheos Church in Zakynthos (Greece), International Journal of Scientific Culture, Volume:4, No 2, pp. 85-95, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.1214571.
  • Maniatis, Y., 1976. ‘Examination of Ancient Pottery Using the Scanning Electron Microscope’. PhD thesis. Department of Physics, University of Essex.
  • Panagopoulou A., Karanasios K., Xanthopoulou G., 2016, Ancient Egyptian Blue (CaCuSi4O10) Pigment by Modern Solution Combustion Synthesis Method, Eurasian Chemico-Technological Journal, Volume: 18, No 1, pp.31-37, ISSN: 1562-3920.
  • Panagopoulou, A. P., Vroom, J., Hein, A. and Kilikoglou, V., 2021. Production Technology of Glazed Pottery in Chalcis, Euboea, during the Middle Byzantine Period, MDPI, Heritage 4(4), 4473-4494; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4040247.

                                               

  Travel & Accommodation & Practicalities  Travel

Athens hosts an International Airport, three ferry ports, two intercity bus stations, metro and train networks. Depending on your starting point, the plane and the ferry are the most practical and preferred options for traveling.       

Greece is a member of the Schengen Agreement.                  

   

                       Accommodation & Meals                      

The reimbursement fee does not include accommodation and fee except the coffee breaks during the workshop. Athens is a tourist city, so you can easily find different kind of accommodation depending to your budget. Prices range from 90€/week in one of the many hostels, to 250€-300€ for a week in a self catered apartment. High end hotels are also of course available if you have a higher budget. The city is well connected with relatively cheap metro and bus system. The prices of the inexpensive and mid-ranged restaurants vary between 15 - 25 Euros for a three-course menu.

     Free Time & Trips

Athens is one of the oldest European capitals which has a lot to offer. Numerus of historic sites and museums in the city deserve a visit: the Acropolis with the Parthenon, the ancient agora of Athens, the theater of Dionysus, the Stoa of Attalos, the Acropolis museum, the National Archaeological museum and many others. The picturesque neighborhoods of Plaka, Monastiraki square and Anatofika offer cozy restaurants, bars and shops. 

  Technicalities & Practicalities 

Insurance: The reimbursement payment does not cover insurance. It is mandatory to arrange your own health insurance before your trip to Greece. The insurance must cover as a minimum the following risks: medical treatment in case of an accident or disease, as well as costs related to evacuation and repatriation. All EU citizens can use Greek medical services as long as they can provide evidence of their home-country health insurance with a card/certificate, etc.

Weather: South-European (Transitional Mediterranean to Continental) climate with hot summers (30-40° C) dominates in the region. Rainy and chillier days in this season are not uncommon.

What to bring?

  • A pair of comfortable shoes for walking/hiking;
  • Wide brim hat;
  • Small backpack (for your water bottle, snacks, camera, etc.)
  • Lab coat
  • Medication - only prescription medicines you may need. It is not necessary to bring non-prescription medicine from your country since you can buy all basic non-prescription drugs in Greece.
  • A converter to EU type electricity wall-plug if needed.
  • A good attitude for work, fun, study and discoveries.

NB! All the tools and materials needed for the workshops will be provided by the organizers!  

    

The Cost

BHFS project reimbursement payment covers: Educational and fieldwork activities, tools, materials, project handbook or readings, issue of Certificate of Attendance, administrative costs, travel related to the fieldwork and the excursions included in the field school program plus relevant entrance fees.

BHFS project reimbursement payment does not include: accomodation and travel costs to and from the project venue or related to activities not included in the field school program; medical products and services and any expenses related to medical quarantine (food delivery, accommodation, etc.).

  

The costs in USD are approximate. Please check the current exchange rates!

   

Early Bird Cost - until March 31, 2024:   


Early Bird cost for a one-week project session is 999 EUR/ approx. 1299 USD   

Early Bird cost for a two-week project session is 1798 EUR/ approx. 1968 USD

   

Regular Cost - after March 31, 2024:         


Early Bird cost for a one-week project session is 1299 EUR/ approx. 1415 USD   

The Regular cost for a twо-week project session is 1848 EUR/ approx. 1968 USD

   

All students registered for BHFS season 2020 should contact BHFS Admissions office at b[email protected] for further information about the conditions of their participation in season 2024. 


Reimbursement Transfer Options:

- Bank transfer
- Online transfers via the Balkan Heritage virtual POS Terminal. VISA, MASTERCARD & MAESTRO cards are accepted.      
Wise money transfer

For further information contact Admissions Office at: [email protected]!

Discounts off the regular cost:

* 5% DISCOUNT OFF the regular cost available for:

  1. Participation in more than one BHFS project in 2024 (discount applies to the second, third, etc. project).
  2. Membership in the Archaeological Institute of America.

* 10% DISCOUNT OFF the regular cost available for:

  1. Participation in any BHFS project/s in the past.

* 12% DISCOUNT OFF the regular cost available for:

  1. Group Participation (three or more people who participate together in one BHFS project in 2024). The discount is valid for each participant.

* 15% DISCOUNT OFF the regular cost is available for:

  1. Group Participation (three or more people, who participate in more than one BHFS project in 2024 (the discount is valid for each participant).
  2. BHFS alumni, who participate in more than one BHFS project in 2024. (discount applies to the second, third, etc. project).
  3. BHFS alumni who attended a full project in the past and return to the same project.

NOTE, 5% OF EVERY COST FOR THIS PROJECT DIRECTLY SUPPORTS THE BALKAN HERITAGE PROTECTION FUND'S ACTIVITIES!

For more information about scholarships, low-cost flights, hotels, etc. please feel free to contact us or look at our recommended links.

New Bulgarian University grants 3/6 ECTS credits to students for attending the one/two week sessions. Transcripts of Records (ToR) are available upon request for an additional tuition fee of 200/400 EUR for EU students and 300/600 EUR for Non-EU students.

For details: Regulations for obtaining Transcripts of Records.

Participants in the field school who do not need academic credit units are not expected to pay for them.

Map

 

Athens, Greece

Workshop for Physicochemical Analysis of Metal Objects and Ceramics


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